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Your media week in two minutes…

The tinsel is back in the attic, the Christmas Tree packed off to ‘the chipper’ and distant relatives forgotten for another 12 months. However, with many left feeling the post-yuletide blues, it seems the one thing we won’t miss is the festive TV schedule.

2015 has kicked off with the news that Christmas TV ratings have fallen once again, prompting many to question whether the days of Xmas Day TV are numbered. Our theory that everyone was merely engrossed with the revamped Bebo, which is  genuinely good fun.

Whatever the answer, the end of the festive break does mean one thing: the return of your weekly dose of innovation. Here’s the five things you need to remember this week…

NEWS STORY OF THE WEEK

Je Suis Charlie becomes a global movement
The world has been left in a state of shock after a terrorist attack on the offices of French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo left 12 people dead. In what is being seen as an attack on free speech, the world has rallied around the hashtag #JESUISCHARLIE to show their support for Charlie Hebdo and to condemn the atrocious attack. The hashtag was started by Thierry Puget and was used a million times on Wednesday alone before featuring heavily in rallies in a number of cities across the globe. The mag’s editorial team have vowed to continue their work and the next edition, which is partly funded by Google, will be the largest yet with a circulation of one million as opposed to 45,000.

TECH STAR OF THE WEEK

The ad industry looks to the future at CES
CES has delivered on its promise to provide a smorgasbord of the exciting new tech that is poised for release this year. Under Armour debuted the latest ‘consumity’, a wearable health-tracker that allows users to network their progress online. Alcatel were nipping at the heels of the iWatch with their OneTouch watch that ‘looks like a watch and feels like a watch’ while boasting ‘smart’ functions at a fraction of the price. Meanwhile, Energous gave a sneak peek into their contribution to the Internet of Things craze, a wireless charging station capable of remotely powering up common household appliances.

CAMPAIGNS OF THE WEEK

The ASB Classic has gone to the dogs…
The ASB Classic attracts some of the top tennis talent in the world, and so New Zealand Bank ASB, which has sponsored the tournament for 19 years, decided it needed the world’s best ball boys too. As Venus Williams took on Svetlana Kuznetsova in a friendly match this week, they turned to three fetchers of the canine variety to collect every stray ball and net-bound shot. Naturally, the stunt served up tons of furry, PR-able cuteness, with the dogs dutifully matching their human counterparts. How long it will be before we see this pack of pups join Sue Barker at Wimbledon?

The (un)official Snack Chip Submission
Newcastle Ale has kicked off this year’s build up to the Oscars of Ad land, The Super Bowl, by crashing the annual Doritos UGC ad. The beer brand, which claims not to have the $4m for its own ad, has entered Doritos’ competition and not so subtly shoehorned in its own branding in the film to get into the Super Bowl for free.  Newcastle’s ad is amusingly bad, which represents a step up from the actual Doritos finalists, and is full of obvious product placement to remain in line with its ethos of shunning classic marketing tactics.

SOCIAL MOMENT OF THE WEEK

The children teaching adults how to be a real man by treat women with respect
A heart-warming video from Italian media outlet Fanpage has used 6- to 11-year-old boys to educate adults on the distressing topic of violence to women. It includes a voiceover that introduces a little girl Martina to the young boys, who then asks them to compliment her, make her laugh, caress her and, in an unexpected turn, slap her. Their reaction to the final request is unanimous with each boy citing a moral obligation to treat women with respect.  The video has raised eyebrows among cynical viewers who have charged it with ‘objectifying girls, exploiting boys and trivialising domestic violence’. Cynicism aside, it’s proved popular with 45 million views on Facebook and 15 million views on YouTube.